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Logo of bmcmeduBioMed Centralsearchsubmit a manuscriptregisterthis articleBMC Medical Education
 
BMC Med Educ. 2004; 4: 12.
Published online Aug 6, 2004. doi:  10.1186/1472-6920-4-12
PMCID: PMC514563
Medical Students' and Residents' preferred site characteristics and preceptor behaviours for learning in the ambulatory setting: a cross-sectional survey
Karen W Schultz,corresponding author1 John Kirby,2 Dianne Delva,1 Marshall Godwin,1 Sarita Verma,1 Richard Birtwhistle,1 Chris Knapper,3 and Rachelle Seguin1
1Department of Family Medicine, Queen's University, 220 Bagot St., PO Bag 8888, Kingston, ON, Canada, K7L 5E9
2Faculty of Education, Queen's University, 511 Union St., Kingston, ON, Canada, K7M 5R4
3Department of Psychology, Queen's University Kingston, ON, Canada, K7L 3N6
corresponding authorCorresponding author.
Karen W Schultz: kws/at/post.queensu.ca; John Kirby: kirbyj/at/educ.queensu.ca; Dianne Delva: mdd2/at/post.queensu.ca; Marshall Godwin: godwinm/at/post.queensu.ca; Sarita Verma: sv3/at/post.queensu.ca; Richard Birtwhistle: birtwhis/at/post.queensu.ca; Chris Knapper: knapper/at/psyc.queensu.ca; Rachelle Seguin: seguinr/at/post.queensu.ca
Received December 8, 2003; Accepted August 6, 2004.
Abstract
Background
Medical training is increasingly occurring in the ambulatory setting for final year medical students and residents. This study looks to identify if gender, school, level of training, or speciality affects learner's (final year medical students and residents) preferred site characteristics and preceptor behaviours for learning in the ambulatory setting.
Methods
All final year medical students and residents at the five medical schools in Ontario (N = 3471) were surveyed about the site characteristics and preceptor behaviours most enhancing their learning in the ambulatory setting. Preferred site characteristics and preceptor behaviours were rank ordered. Factor analysis grouped the site characteristics and preceptor behaviours into themes which were then correlated with gender, school, level of training, and speciality.
Results
Having an adequate number and variety of patients while being supervised by enthusiastic preceptors who give feedback and are willing to discuss their reasoning processes and delegate responsibility are site characteristics and preceptor behaviours valued by almost all learners. Some teaching strategies recently suggested to improve efficiency in the ambulatory teaching setting, such as structuring the interview for the student and teaching and reviewing the case in front of the patient, were found not to be valued by learners. There was a striking degree of similarity in what was valued by all learners but there were also some educationally significant differences, particularly between learners at different levels and in different specialities. Key findings between the different levels include preceptor interaction being most important for medical students as opposed to residents who most value issues pertaining to patient logistics. Learning resources are less valued early and late in training. Teaching and having the case reviewed in front of the patient becomes increasingly less valued as learners advance in their training. As one approaches the end of ones' training office management instruction becomes increasingly valued. Differences between specialities pertain most to the type of practice residents will ultimately end up in (ie: office based specialties particularly valuing instruction in office management and health care system interaction).
Conclusions
Preceptors need to be aware of, and make efforts to provide, teaching strategies such as feedback and discussing clinical reasoning, that learners have identified as being helpful for learning. If strategies identified as not being valued for learning, such as teaching in front of the patient, must continue it will be important to explore the barriers they present to learning. Although what all learners want from their preceptors and clinic settings to enhance their learning is remarkably similar, being aware of the educationally significant differences, particularly for learners at different levels and in different specialities, will enhance teaching in the ambulatory setting.
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