PMCCPMCCPMCC

Search tips
Search criteria 

Advanced

 
Logo of jcinvestThe Journal of Clinical Investigation
 
J Clin Invest. 1997 February 1; 99(3): 385–390.
PMCID: PMC507810

Diet-induced obese mice develop peripheral, but not central, resistance to leptin.

Abstract

Leptin administration reduces obesity in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice; its effects in obese humans, who have high circulating leptin levels, remain to be determined. This longitudinal study was designed to determine whether diet-induced obesity in mice produces resistance to peripheral and/or central leptin treatment. Obesity was induced in two strains of mice by exposure to a 45% fat diet. Serum leptin increased in proportion to body weight (P < 0.00001). Whereas C57BL/6 mice initially responded to peripherally administered leptin with a marked decrease in food intake, leptin resistance developed after 16 d on high fat diet; mice on 10% fat diet retained leptin sensitivity. In AKR mice, peripheral leptin significantly decreased food intake in both 10 and 45% fat-fed mice after 16 d of dietary treatment. However, after 56 d, both groups became resistant to peripherally administered leptin. Central administration of leptin to peripherally leptin-resistant AKR mice on 45% fat diet resulted in a robust response to leptin, with a dose-dependent decrease in food intake (P < 0.00001) and body weight (P < 0.0001) after a single intracerebroventricular infusion. These data demonstrate that, in a diet-induced obesity model, mice exhibit resistance to peripherally administered leptin, while retaining sensitivity to centrally administered leptin.


Articles from The Journal of Clinical Investigation are provided here courtesy of American Society for Clinical Investigation