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J Clin Invest. 1979 November; 64(5): 1365–1370.
PMCID: PMC371284

Genetic evidence for a common enzyme catalyzing the second step in the degradation of proline and hydroxyproline.

Abstract

The initial step in the degradation pathways of proline and hydroxyproline is catalyzed by proline oxidase and hydroxyproline oxidase, yielding delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate and delta 1-pyrroline-3-hydroxy-5-carboxylate, respectively. The second step is the oxidation of delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate to glutamate and delta 1-pyrroline-3-hydroxy-5-carboxylate to gamma-hydroxy-glutamate. To determine if this second step in the degradation of proline and hydroxyproline is catalyzed by a common or by separate enzyme(s), we developed a radioisotopic assay for delta 1-pyrroline-3-hydroxy-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase activity. We then compared delta1-pyrroline-3-hydroxy-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase activity with that of delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase in fibroblasts and leukocytes from type II hyperprolinemia patients, heterozygotes, and controls. We found that cells from type II hyperprolinemia patients were deficient in both dehydrogenase activities. Furthermore, these activities were highly correlated over the range found in the normals, heterozygotes, and patients. We conclude from these data that a common delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase catalyzes the oxidation of both delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate and delta 1-pyrroline-3-hydroxy-5-carboxylate, and that this activity is deficient in type II hyperprolinemia.

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Selected References

These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article.
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