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Mol Cell Biol. Oct 1992; 12(10): 4456–4463.
PMCID: PMC360370
Accumulation of U14 small nuclear RNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires box C, box D, and a 5', 3' terminal stem.
G M Huang, A Jarmolowski, J C Struck, and M J Fournier
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst 01003.
Abstract
U14 is one of several nucleolar small nuclear RNAs required for normal processing of rRNA. Functional mapping of U14 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has yielded a number of mutants defective in U14 accumulation or function. In this study, we have further defined three structural elements required for U14 accumulation. The essential elements include the U14-conserved box C and box D sequences and a 5', 3' terminal stem. The box elements are coconserved among several nucleolar small nuclear RNAs and have been implicated in binding of the protein fibrillarin. New mutational results show that the first GA bases of the box C sequence UGAUGA are essential, and two vital bases in box D have also been identified. An intragenic suppressor of a lethal box C mutant has been isolated and shown to contain a new box C-like PyGAUG sequence two bases upstream of normal box C. The importance of the terminal stem was confirmed from new compensatory base changes and the finding that accumulation defects in the box elements can be complemented by extending the terminal stem. The results suggest that the observed defects in accumulation reflect U14 instability and that protein binding to one or more of these elements is required for metabolic stability.
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