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Mol Cell Biol. 1994 July; 14(7): 4779–4787.
PMCID: PMC358851

Role of Swi4 in cell cycle regulation of CLN2 expression.

Abstract

Expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CLN1 and CLN2 genes is cell cycle regulated, and the genes may be controlled by positive feedback. It has been proposed that positive feedback operates via Cln/Cdc28 activation of the Swi4/Swi6 transcription factor, leading to CLN1 and CLN2 transcription due to Swi4 binding to specific sites (SCBs) in the CLN1 and CLN2 promoters. To test this proposal, we have examined the effects of deletion either of the potential SCBs in the CLN2 promoter or of the SWI4 gene on CLN2 transcriptional control. Deletion of a restriction fragment containing the identified SCBs from the promoter does not prevent cell cycle regulation of CLN2 expression, although expression is lowered at all cell cycle positions. A promoter containing a 5.5-kb plasmid insertion or an independent 2.5-kb insertion at the point of deletion of the SCB-containing restriction fragment also exhibits cell cycle regulation, so involvement of unidentified upstream SCBs is unlikely. Neither Swi4 nor the related Mbp1 transcription factor is required for cell cycle regulation of the intact CLN2 promoter. In contrast, Swi4 (but not Mbp1) is required for correct cell cycle regulation of the insertion/deletion promoter lacking SCB sites. We have extended previous genetic evidence for involvement of Swi4 in some aspect of CLN2 function: a mutant hunt for CLN2 positive regulatory factors yielded only swi4 mutations at saturation. Swi4 may bind to nonconsensus sequences in the CLN2 promoter (possibly in addition to consensus sites), or it may act indirectly to regulate CLN2 expression.

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