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Biol Direct. 2012; 7: 34.
Published online Oct 4, 2012. doi:  10.1186/1745-6150-7-34
PMCID: PMC3500653
Proteorhodopsin genes in giant viruses
Natalya Yutin1 and Eugene V Koonincorresponding author1
1National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA
corresponding authorCorresponding author.
Natalya Yutin: yutin/at/ncbi.nlm.nih.gov; Eugene V Koonin: koonin/at/ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
Received August 30, 2012; Accepted October 1, 2012.
Abstract
Viruses with large genomes encode numerous proteins that do not directly participate in virus biogenesis but rather modify key functional systems of infected cells. We report that a distinct group of giant viruses infecting unicellular eukaryotes that includes Organic Lake Phycodnaviruses and Phaeocystis globosa virus encode predicted proteorhodopsins that have not been previously detected in viruses. Search of metagenomic sequence data shows that putative viral proteorhodopsins are extremely abundant in marine environments. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that giant viruses acquired proteorhodopsins via horizontal gene transfer from proteorhodopsin-encoding protists although the actual donor(s) could not be presently identified. The pattern of conservation of the predicted functionally important amino acid residues suggests that viral proteorhodopsin homologs function as sensory rhodopsins. We hypothesize that viral rhodopsins modulate light-dependent signaling, in particular phototaxis, in infected protists.
This article was reviewed by Igor B. Zhulin and Laksminarayan M. Iyer. For the full reviews, see the Reviewers’ reports section.
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