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Addict Sci Clin Pract. 2012; 7(Suppl 1): A28.
Published online Oct 9, 2012. doi:  10.1186/1940-0640-7-S1-A28
PMCID: PMC3480068
Predictive value of readiness, importance, and confidence in ability to change drinking and smoking
Nicolas Bertholet,corresponding author1 Jacques Gaume,1 Mohamed Faouzi,1 Jean-Bernard Daeppen,1 and Gerhard Gmel1
1Center for Alcohol Treatment, Department of Medicine and Public Health, Lausanne University, Lausanne, Switzerland
corresponding authorCorresponding author.
Supplement
International Network on Brief Interventions for Alcohol and Other Drugs (INEBRIA) Meeting 2011
Richard Saitz
The conference was funded in part by grants from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). The content of the abstracts included in this supplement is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of NIAAA, NIDA, or the National Institutes of Health. Financial support for publication of this supplement was provided by the US National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).
Conference
International Network on Brief Interventions for Alcohol and Other Drugs (INEBRIA) Meeting 2011
21-23 September 2011
Boston, MA, USA
 
Visual analog scales (VASs) are used to assess readiness to change constructs, which are considered critical for change. We studied whether three constructs—readiness to change, importance of changing, and confidence in ability to change—predict risk status six months later in 20-year-old men with either or both of two behaviors: risky drinking and smoking. Five hundred and seventy-seven participants in a randomized trial of brief intervention (BI) were assessed at baseline and six months on alcohol and tobacco consumption, with three 1-10 VASs (readiness, importance, confidence) for each behavior. We used one regression model for each behavior and construct. Models controlled for receipt of BI and used the VAS lowest level (1-4) as the reference group (versus medium [5-7] and high [8-10] levels). Among the 475 risky drinkers, mean (SD) readiness, importance, and confidence in ability to change drinking were 4.0 (3.1), 2.8 (2.2), and 7.2 (3.0). Readiness was not associated with being free of alcohol risk at six months (OR 1.3 [0.7; 2.2] and 1.4 [0.8; 2.6] for medium and high readiness). High importance and confidence were associated with being risk free (OR 0.9 [0.5; 1.8] and 2.9 [1.2; 7.5] for medium and high importance; 2.1 [1.0; 4.8] and 2.8 [1.5; 5.6] for medium and high confidence). Among the 320 smokers, mean readiness, importance, and confidence to change were 4.6 (2.6), 5.3 (2.6), and 5.9 (2.6). Neither readiness nor importance was associated with being smoking free (OR 2.1 [0.9; 4.7] and 2.1 [0.8; 5.8] for medium and high readiness; 1.4 [0.6; 3.4] and 2.1 [0.8; 5.4] for medium and high importance). High confidence was associated with being smoking free (OR 2.2 [0.8; 6.6] and 3.4 [1.2; 9.8] for medium and high confidence). For drinking and smoking, high confidence in ability to change was associated, with similar magnitude, with a favorable outcome. This points to the value of confidence as a predictor of successful change.
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