PMCCPMCCPMCC

Search tips
Search criteria 

Advanced

 
Logo of archplastsurgArchives of Plastic SurgeryThis ArticleFor Contributorse-Submission
 
Arch Plast Surg. Sep 2012; 39(5): 470–476.
Published online Sep 12, 2012. doi:  10.5999/aps.2012.39.5.470
PMCID: PMC3474403
Surgical Correction of Whistle Deformity Using Cross-Muscle Flap in Secondary Cleft Lip
Woo Young Choi,1 Jeong Yeol Yang,corresponding author1 Gyu Bo Kim,1 and Yun Ju Han2
1Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju, Korea.
2Graduate School of Chosun University, Gwangju, Korea.
corresponding authorCorresponding author.
Correspondence: Jeong Yeol Yang. Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Chosun University College of Medicine, 365 Pilmun-daero, Dong-gu, Gwangju 501-717, Korea. Tel: +82-62-220-3180, Fax: +82-62-225-0996, jyyang/at/chosun.ac.kr
Received May 9, 2012; Revised July 30, 2012; Accepted August 1, 2012.
Abstract
Background
The whistle deformity is one of the common sequelae of secondary cleft lip deformities. Santos reported using a crossed-denuded flap for primary cleft lip repair to prevent a vermilion notching. The authors modified this technique to correct the whistle deformity, calling their version the cross-muscle flap.
Methods
From May 2005 to January 2011, 14 secondary unilateral cleft lip patients were treated. All suffered from a whistle deformity, which is characterized by the deficiency of the central tubercle, notching in the upper lip, and bulging on the lateral segment. The mean age of the patients was 13.8 years and the mean follow-up period was 21.8 weeks. After elevation from the lateral vermilion and medial tubercle, two muscle flaps were crossed and turned over. The authors measured the three vertical heights and compared the two height ratios before and after surgery for evaluation of the postoperative results.
Results
None of the patients had any notable complications and the whistle deformity was corrected in all cases. The vertical height ratios at the midline on the upper lip and the affected Cupid's bow point were increased (P<0.05). The motion of the upper lip was acceptable.
Conclusions
A cross muscle flap is simple and it leaves a minimal scar on the lip. We were able to reconstruct the whistle deformity in secondary unilateral cleft lip patients with a single state procedure using a cross-muscle flap.
Keywords: Cleft lip, Surgical flaps, Lip
Articles from Archives of Plastic Surgery are provided here courtesy of
Korean Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons