PMCCPMCCPMCC

Search tips
Search criteria 

Advanced

 
Logo of bmcpediBioMed Centralsearchsubmit a manuscriptregisterthis articleBMC Pediatrics
 
BMC Pediatr. 2012; 12: 121.
Published online Aug 14, 2012. doi:  10.1186/1471-2431-12-121
PMCID: PMC3447658
Pediatric first aid knowledge and attitudes among staff in the preschools of Shanghai, China
Feng Li,1,2 Fan Jiang,corresponding author1 Xingming Jin,1 Yulan Qiu,3 and Xiaoming Shencorresponding author4
1Department of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Shanghai Pediatric Translational Research Institute, Shanghai Children's Medical Center affiliated Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Children’s Environmental Health, MOE-Shanghai Key Laboratory of Children's Environmental Health, Ministry of Education, China, 1678 Dongfang Rd, Shanghai 200127, China
2Department of Children and Adolescents Health Care, Xin Hua Hospital affiliated Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Children's Environmental Health, MOE-Shanghai Key Laboratory of Children's Environmental Health, Ministry of Education, China, 1665 Kongjiang Rd, Shanghai 200092, China
3School of Public Health affiliated Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, 227 South Chongqing Rd, Shanghai 200025, China
4Shanghai Institute for Pediatric Research, Xinhua Hospital affiliated Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Children's Environmental Health, MOE-Shanghai Key Laboratory of Children's Environmental Health, Ministry of Education, China, 1665 Kongjiang Rd, Shanghai 200092, China
corresponding authorCorresponding author.
Feng Li: lifeng0228/at/163.com; Fan Jiang: fanjiang/at/shsmu.edu.cn; Xingming Jin: zhujing7/at/msn.cn; Yulan Qiu: qiuqiuyulan/at/hotmail.com; Xiaoming Shen: xmshen/at/online.sh.cn
Received January 18, 2012; Accepted August 3, 2012.
Abstract
Background
Unintentional injury remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among children worldwide. The aims of this study were to assess a baseline level of first aid knowledge and overall attitudes regarding first aid among staff members in Shanghai preschools.
Methods
A cross-sectional study was carried out among the staff members at selected preschools. A stratified random sampling method was first used to identify suitable subjects. Data were obtained using a multiple-choice questionnaire. A standardized collection of demographics was performed and participants were given the aforementioned questionnaire to indicate knowledge of and attitudes toward first aid.
Results
1067 subjects completed the questionnaire. None of the surveyed employees answered all questions correctly; only 39 individuals (3.7%) achieved passing scores. The relative number of correct answers to specific questions ranged from 16.5% to 90.2%. In particular, subjects lacked knowledge regarding first aid for convulsive seizures (only 16.5% answered correctly), chemical injuries to the eye (23%), inhaled poison (27.6%), and choking and coughing (30.1%). A multiple linear regression analysis showed scores were significantly higher among staff members with more education, those who had received first aid training before or were already healthcare providers, younger employees, and staff members from rural districts. Most employees agreed that giving first aid was helpful; the vast majority felt that it was important and useful for them to learn pediatric first aid.
Conclusions
The level of first-aid knowledge among preschool staffs in Shanghai was low. There is an urgent need to educate staff members regarding first aid practices and the various risk factors relating to specific injuries.
Keywords: First aid, Preschool staff, Knowledge
Articles from BMC Pediatrics are provided here courtesy of
BioMed Central