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Logo of bmcgastBioMed Centralsearchsubmit a manuscriptregisterthis articleBMC Gastroenterology
 
BMC Gastroenterol. 2012; 12: 104.
Published online Aug 9, 2012. doi:  10.1186/1471-230X-12-104
PMCID: PMC3436771
The impact of Irritable Bowel Syndrome on health-related quality of life: a Singapore perspective
Yu Tien Wang,corresponding author1 Hwee Yong Lim,2 David Tai,2 Thinesh L Krishnamoorthy,1 Tira Tan,2 Sylvaine Barbier,3 and Julian Thumboo4
1Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore
2National Cancer Center, Singapore
3Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore
4Department of Rheumatology & Immunology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore
corresponding authorCorresponding author.
Yu Tien Wang: wangyutien/at/gmail.com; Hwee Yong Lim: lim.hwee.yong/at/nccs.com.sg; David Tai: david.tai/at/nccs.com.sg; Thinesh L Krishnamoorthy: thinesh.l.krishnamoorthy/at/singhealth.com.sg; Tira Tan: tira.tan.j.y/at/singhealth.com.sg; Sylvaine Barbier: sylvaine.barbier/at/duke-nus.edu.sg; Julian Thumboo: julian.thumboo/at/sgh.com.sg
Received January 3, 2012; Accepted August 2, 2012.
Abstract
Background
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder. The prevalence of IBS in Asian countries varies from 2.9% to 15.6%. IBS does not result in increased mortality, but is associated with psychological distress and disruption of work and sleep. Consequently, the evaluation of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is an important outcome measure for patients with IBS since it provides a holistic assessment of the patient's emotional, social and physical function. However, some HRQoL tools can be time-consuming to apply. EQ-5D is a brief HRQoL tool which has been validated in the Western IBS population but has thus far not been used in Asia. This study was conducted to determine whether persons with self-reported symptoms that met the Rome III criteria for IBS had a poorer quality of life than those without these symptoms. We also aimed to determine which specific aspects of quality of life were most affected and whether any risk factors distinguished those with and without IBS.
Methods
Self-administered questionnaires which included the Rome III diagnostic questionnaire modules for IBS and the EQ-5D questionnaire were obtained from participants of a health symposium in Singapore on 31th October 2010. IBS was diagnosed based on the Rome III Criteria. The main outcome measure was the EQ-5D index score. The relationship between the presence of IBS and the EQ-5D index score, individual dimensions of EQ-5D and demographic risk factors were examined.
Results
449 completed questionnaires were analyzed. The mean EQ-5D index score for IBS was 0.739 which was a significant reduction compared to non-IBS participants [−0.11 (95% CI: -0.15 to −0.07), p < 0.001]. Multivariate analysis showed that IBS was significantly associated with younger age and higher education level. Of the five EQ-5D dimensions, IBS sufferers were significantly affected in mobility, anxiety or depression, usual activity and pain. There was a "dose related" increase in likelihood of having IBS with increased severity of pain and anxiety or depression.
Conclusion
IBS sufferers have significantly poorer quality of life. Assessment of HRQoL in IBS using the EQ-5D should be considered in further studies and routine clinical practice.
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