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BMC Public Health. 2012; 12: 330.
Published online May 4, 2012. doi:  10.1186/1471-2458-12-330
PMCID: PMC3432623
Lifestyle and health-related quality of life: A cross-sectional study among civil servants in China
Jun Xu,corresponding author1 Jincai Qiu,1 Jie Chen,2 Liai Zou,1 Liyi Feng,3 Yan Lu,1 Qian Wei,1 and Jinhua Zhang4
1Department of Sanitation Economy Administration, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, PR China
2School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, PR China
3Medicare office, First People’s Hospital, Shunde, Foshan, Guangdong Province, PR China
4School of Nursing, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, PR China
corresponding authorCorresponding author.
Jun Xu: drugstat/at/163.com; Jincai Qiu: 605125783/at/qq.com; Jie Chen: cj0901/at/fimmu.com; Liai Zou: imyshu/at/126.com; Liyi Feng: 386975729/at/qq.com; Yan Lu: 517211335/at/qq.com; Qian Wei: 19098481/at/qq.com; Jinhua Zhang: zjh2046/at/gmail.com
Received November 18, 2011; Accepted May 4, 2012.
Abstract
Background
Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has been increasingly acknowledged as a valid and appropriate indicator of public health and chronic morbidity. However, limited research was conducted among Chinese civil servants owing to the different lifestyle. The aim of the study was to evaluate the HRQoL among Chinese civil servants and to identify factors might be associated with their HRQoL.
Methods
A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate HRQoL of 15,000 civil servants in China using stratified random sampling methods. Independent-Samples t-Test, one-way ANOVA, and multiple stepwise regression were used to analyse the influencing factors and the HRQoL of the civil servants.
Results
A univariate analysis showed that there were significant differences among physical component summary (PCS), mental component summary (MCS), and TS between lifestyle factors, such as smoking, drinking alcohol, having breakfast, sleep time, physical exercise, work time, operating computers, and sedentariness (P < 0.05). Multiple stepwise regressions showed that there were significant differences among TS between lifestyle factors, such as breakfast, sleep time, physical exercise, operating computers, sedentariness, work time, and drinking (P < 0.05).
Conclusion
In this study, using Short Form 36 items (SF-36), we assessed the association of HRQoL with lifestyle factors, including smoking, drinking alcohol, having breakfast, sleep time, physical exercise, work time, operating computers, and sedentariness in China. The performance of the questionnaire in the large-scale survey is satisfactory and provides a large picture of the HRQoL status in Chinese civil servants. Our results indicate that lifestyle factors such as smoking, drinking alcohol, having breakfast, sleep time, physical exercise, work time, operating computers, and sedentariness affect the HRQoL of civil servants in China.
Keywords: Health-related quality of life, SF-36, Civil servants, Lifestyle
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