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Logo of bmcimmBioMed Centralsearchsubmit a manuscriptregisterthis articleBMC Immunology
 
BMC Immunol. 2012; 13: 39.
Published online Jul 12, 2012. doi:  10.1186/1471-2172-13-39
PMCID: PMC3411419
Discordant antibody and cellular responses to Pneumocystis major surface glycoprotein variants in mice
Lisa R Bishop,1 Daniel Helman,1 and Joseph A Kovacscorresponding author1
1Critical Care Medicine Department, NIH Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD, 20892-1662, USA
corresponding authorCorresponding author.
Lisa R Bishop: lbishop/at/cc.nih.gov; Daniel Helman: d.j.helman/at/gmail.com; Joseph A Kovacs: jkovacs/at/mail.nih.gov
Received December 28, 2011; Accepted July 12, 2012.
Abstract
Background
The major surface glycoprotein (Msg) of Pneumocystis is encoded by approximately 50 to 80 unique but related genes. Msg diversity may represent a mechanism for immune escape from host T cell responses. We examined splenic T cell proliferative and cytokine as well as serum antibody responses to recombinant and native Pneumocystis antigens in immunized or Pneumocystis-infected mice. In addition, immune responses were examined in 5 healthy humans.
Results
Proliferative responses to each of two recombinant Msg variant proteins were seen in mice immunized with either recombinant protein, but no proliferation to these antigens was seen in mice immunized with crude Pneumocystis antigens or in mice that had cleared infection, although the latter animals demonstrated proliferative responses to crude Pneumocystis antigens and native Msg. IL-17 and MCP-3 were produced in previously infected animals in response to the same antigens, but not to recombinant antigens. Antibody responses to the recombinant P. murina Msg variant proteins were seen in all groups of animals, demonstrating that all groups were exposed to and mounted immune responses to Msg. No human PBMC samples proliferated following stimulation with P. jirovecii Msg, while antibody responses were detected in sera from 4 of 5 samples.
Conclusions
Cross-reactive antibody responses to Msg variants are common, while cross-reactive T cell responses are uncommon; these results support the hypothesis that Pneumocystis utilizes switching of Msg variant expression to avoid host T cell responses.
Keywords: Antigenic variation, Immune response, Major surface glycoprotein, Pneumocystis
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