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Logo of bmcgeriBioMed Centralsearchsubmit a manuscriptregisterthis articleBMC Geriatrics
 
BMC Geriatr. 2012; 12: 23.
Published online Jun 6, 2012. doi:  10.1186/1471-2318-12-23
PMCID: PMC3404007
A protocol for a randomized clinical trial of interactive video dance: potential for effects on cognitive function
Jelena Jovancevic,corresponding author1 Caterina Rosano,2 Subashan Perera,1 Kirk I Erickson,3 and Stephanie Studenski1
1School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, USA
2School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, USA
3Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, USA
corresponding authorCorresponding author.
Jelena Jovancevic: Jvj2/at/pitt.edu; Caterina Rosano: RosanoC/at/edc.pitt.edu; Subashan Perera: Ksp9/at/pitt.edu; Kirk I Erickson: kiericks/at/pitt.edu; Stephanie Studenski: Sas33/at/pitt.edu
Received October 13, 2011; Accepted June 6, 2012.
Abstract
Background
Physical exercise has the potential to affect cognitive function, but most evidence to date focuses on cognitive effects of fitness training. Cognitive exercise also may influence cognitive function, but many cognitive training paradigms have failed to provide carry-over to daily cognitive function. Video games provide a broader, more contextual approach to cognitive training that may induce cognitive gains and have carry over to daily function. Most video games do not involve physical exercise, but some novel forms of interactive video games combine physical activity and cognitive challenge.
Methods/Design
This paper describes a randomized clinical trial in 168 postmenopausal sedentary overweight women that compares an interactive video dance game with brisk walking and delayed entry controls. The primary endpoint is adherence to activity at six months. Additional endpoints include aspects of physical and mental health. We focus this report primarily on the rationale and plans for assessment of multiple cognitive functions.
Discussion
This randomized clinical trial may provide new information about the cognitive effects of interactive videodance. It is also the first trial to examine physical and cognitive effects in older women. Interactive video games may offer novel strategies to promote physical activity and health across the life span.
The study is IRB approved and the number is: PRO08080012
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01443455
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