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Logo of bmcurolBioMed Centralsearchsubmit a manuscriptregisterthis articleBMC Urology
 
BMC Urol. 2012; 12: 9.
Published online Mar 27, 2012. doi:  10.1186/1471-2490-12-9
PMCID: PMC3350396
Potential relevance of pre-operative quality of life questionnaires to identify candidates for surgical treatment of genital prolapse: a pilot study
Christian Chauvin,1 Elisabeth Chéreau,1 Marcos Ballester,1 and Emile Daraïcorresponding author1
1Service de Gynécologie-Obstétrique, Hôpital Tenon, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Paris, France
corresponding authorCorresponding author.
Christian Chauvin: chx2fr/at/yahoo.fr; Elisabeth Chéreau: elisabeth.chereau/at/tnn.aphp.fr; Marcos Ballester: marcos.ballester/at/tnn.aphp.fr; Emile Daraï: emile.darai/at/tnn.aphp.fr
Received September 8, 2011; Accepted March 27, 2012.
Abstract
Background
To evaluate prolapse-related symptoms, quality of life and sexuality of patients with validated questionnaires before and after surgery for genital prolapse and assess relevance of such an evaluation to select women for surgery.
Methods
From November 2009 to April 2010, 16 patients operated on for genital prolapse of grade greater than or equal to 2 (POP-Q classification) were evaluated prospectively by three questionnaires of quality of life Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory (PFDI-20), Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire (PFIQ-7) and Pelvic Organ Prolaps/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ-12). Data were collected the day before surgery and 6 weeks postoperatively.
Results
Eleven patients had laparoscopic surgery and five vaginal surgery. There was a significant decrease in pelvic heaviness, vaginal discomfort and urinary symptoms after surgery. The score of symptoms of prolapse, the PFDI-20 score was 98.5 preoperatively and 31.8 postoperatively (p < 0.0001). The score for quality of life, the PFIQ-7 score was 54.5 preoperatively and 7.4 postoperatively (p = 0.001). The score of sexuality, the PISQ-12 score was 35.3 preoperatively and 37.5 postoperatively (p = 0.1). Two of the 3 patients with a PFIQ 7 under or equal to 20 were not improved while all the women with a preoperative PFIQ-7 over 20 were improved after surgery.
Conclusions
This study suggests that surgery improves quality of life of patients with genital prolapse. Quality of life questionnaires could help select good candidates for surgery. Further studies are required to determine threshold to standardize indications of surgery.
Keywords: Genital prolapse, Quality of life questionnaire, Surgery
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