PMCCPMCCPMCC

Search tips
Search criteria 

Advanced

 
Logo of bmcphBioMed Centralsearchsubmit a manuscriptregisterthis articleBMC Public Health
 
BMC Public Health. 2012; 12: 192.
Published online Mar 15, 2012. doi:  10.1186/1471-2458-12-192
PMCID: PMC3342160
Ideal and actual involvement of community pharmacists in health promotion and prevention: a cross-sectional study in Quebec, Canada
Marie-Claude Laliberté,1,2 Sylvie Perreault,1,3 Nicole Damestoy,4,5,6 and Lyne Lalondecorresponding author1,2,7
1Faculty of Pharmacy, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7, Canada
2Équipe de recherche en soins de première ligne, Centre de santé et de services sociaux de Laval, 1755 René-Laennec Blvd, room D-S080, Laval, Quebec H7M 3L9, Canada
3Sanofi Aventis Endowment Chair in Drug Utilization, Faculty of Pharmacy, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7, Canada
4Direction Prévention-Promotion, Centre de santé et de services sociaux de Laval, 800 Chomedey Blvd, Tour A, Laval, Quebec H7V 3Y4, Canada
5Direction de santé publique, Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Laval, 800 Chomedey Blvd, Tour A, Laval, Quebec H7V 3Y4, Canada
6Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7, Canada
7Sanofi Aventis Endowment Chair in Ambulatory Pharmaceutical Care, Faculty of Pharmacy, Université de Montréal, C.P. 8128, Succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7, Canada
corresponding authorCorresponding author.
Marie-Claude Laliberté: marie-claude.laliberte/at/umontreal.ca; Sylvie Perreault: sylvie.perreault/at/umontreal.ca; Nicole Damestoy: nicole_damestoy/at/ssss.gouv.qc.ca; Lyne Lalonde: lyne.lalonde/at/umontreal.ca
Received December 21, 2011; Accepted March 15, 2012.
Abstract
Background
An increased interest is observed in broadening community pharmacists' role in public health. To date, little information has been gathered in Canada on community pharmacists' perceptions of their role in health promotion and prevention; however, such data are essential to the development of public-health programs in community pharmacy. A cross-sectional study was therefore conducted to explore the perceptions of community pharmacists in urban and semi-urban areas regarding their ideal and actual levels of involvement in providing health-promotion and prevention services and the barriers to such involvement.
Methods
Using a five-step modified Dillman's tailored design method, a questionnaire with 28 multiple-choice or open-ended questions (11 pages plus a cover letter) was mailed to a random sample of 1,250 pharmacists out of 1,887 community pharmacists practicing in Montreal (Quebec, Canada) and surrounding areas. It included questions on pharmacists' ideal level of involvement in providing health-promotion and preventive services; which services were actually offered in their pharmacy, the employees involved, the frequency, and duration of the services; the barriers to the provision of these services in community pharmacy; their opinion regarding the most appropriate health professionals to provide them; and the characteristics of pharmacists, pharmacies and their clientele.
Results
In all, 571 out of 1,234 (46.3%) eligible community pharmacists completed and returned the questionnaire. Most believed they should be very involved in health promotion and prevention, particularly in smoking cessation (84.3%); screening for hypertension (81.8%), diabetes (76.0%) and dyslipidemia (56.9%); and sexual health (61.7% to 89.1%); however, fewer respondents reported actually being very involved in providing such services (5.7% [lifestyle, including smoking cessation], 44.5%, 34.8%, 6.5% and 19.3%, respectively). The main barriers to the provision of these services in current practice were lack of: time (86.1%), coordination with other health care professionals (61.1%), staff or resources (57.2%), financial compensation (50.8%), and clinical tools (45.5%).
Conclusions
Although community pharmacists think they should play a significant role in health promotion and prevention, they recognize a wide gap between their ideal and actual levels of involvement. The efficient integration of primary-care pharmacists and pharmacies into public health cannot be envisioned without addressing important organizational barriers.
Keywords: Community pharmacists, Cross-sectional study, Health promotion, Prevention, Public health
Articles from BMC Public Health are provided here courtesy of
BioMed Central