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Anesthesiol Res Pract. 2012; 2012: 731645.
Published online Jan 19, 2012. doi:  10.1155/2012/731645
PMCID: PMC3270549
Clinical Implications of the Transversus Abdominis Plane Block in Adults
Mark J. Young, 1 Andrew W. Gorlin, 2 Vicki E. Modest, 1 ,3 and Sadeq A. Quraishi 1 ,3 *
1Department of Anesthesiology, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
2Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA
3Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
*Sadeq A. Quraishi: squraishi/at/partners.org
Academic Editor: D. John Doyle
Received July 31, 2011; Revised September 21, 2011; Accepted September 27, 2011.
Abstract
The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a relatively new regional anesthesia technique that provides analgesia to the parietal peritoneum as well as the skin and muscles of the anterior abdominal wall. It has a high margin of safety and is technically simple to perform, especially under ultrasound guidance. A growing body of evidence supports the use of TAP blocks for a variety of abdominal procedures, yet, widespread adoption of this therapeutic adjunct has been slow. In part, this may be related to the limited sources for anesthesiologists to develop an appreciation for its sound anatomical basis and the versatility of its clinical application. As such, we provide a brief historical perspective on the TAP block, describe relevant anatomy, review current techniques, discuss pharmacologic considerations, and summarize the existing literature regarding its clinical utility with an emphasis on recently published studies that have not been included in other systematic reviews or meta-analyses.
Articles from Anesthesiology Research and Practice are provided here courtesy of
Hindawi Publishing Corporation