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Logo of bmjcrInstructions for authorsCurrent ToCBMJ Case Reports
 
BMJ Case Rep. 2010; 2010: bcr0620103083.
Published online Nov 26, 2010. doi:  10.1136/bcr.06.2010.3083
PMCID: PMC3028036
Unusual association of diseases/symptoms
A patient with bilateral facial palsy associated with hypertension and chickenpox: learning points
Eslam Al-Abadi,1 David V Milford,1 and Martin Smith2
1Department of Nephrology, Birmingham Children's Hospital, Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
2Department of Neurology, Birmingham Children's Hospital, Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
Correspondence to Eslam Al-Abadi, drislam77/at/doctors.org.uk
Abstract
Bilateral facial nerve paralysis is an uncommon presentation and even more so in children. There are reports of different causes of bilateral facial nerve palsy. It is well-established that hypertension and chickenpox causes unilateral facial paralysis and the importance of checking the blood pressure in children with facial nerve paralysis cannot be stressed enough. The authors report a boy with bilateral facial nerve paralysis in association with hypertension and having recently recovered from chickenpox. The authors review aspects of bilateral facial nerve paralysis as well as hypertension and chickenpox causing facial nerve paralysis.
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