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Acta Crystallogr Sect E Struct Rep Online. 2008 June 1; 64(Pt 6): o981–o982.
Published online 2008 May 3. doi:  10.1107/S160053680801252X
PMCID: PMC2961343

(2E)-2-(2,4-Dichloro­phenyl­sulfon­yl)-3-(3-methoxy­anilino)-3-(methyl­sulfan­yl)acrylonitrile

Abstract

The title compound, C17H14Cl2N2O3S2, and the 4-methyl­anilino analogue reported in the following paper have been used as starting materials to develop benzothia­zine derivatives with anti­malarial activity. The mol­ecule displays an E (trans) configuration about the central double bond. Due to conjugation in the C=C—C N group, the putative single bond shows a significant shortening [1.421 (3) Å]. The mol­ecule has a six-membered ring involving an intra­molecular N—H(...)O(sulfon­yl) bond, which is an example of resonance-assisted hydrogen bonding. There is also an intra­molecular N—H(...)Cl hydrogen bond. In the crystal structure, bonds of the C—H(...)O(sulfon­yl) type form chains that run along [101], while N—H(...)O(sulfon­yl) bonds connect centrosymmetrically related molecules in pairs of these chains, forming ribbons. Comparison of the N(...)O distances in the intra- and inter­molecular N—H(...)O(sulfon­yl) bonds reveals that the π-bond co-operativity results in a strengthening of the intra­molecular hydrogen bond. There are also π–π inter­actions between benzene rings of pairs of centrosymmetrically related mol­ecules [centroid–centroid distance = 3.8612 (13) Å], as well as C—H(...)π interactions.

Related literature

For related literature, see: Allen (2002 [triangle]); Allen et al. (1987 [triangle]); Baraza­rte et al. (2008 [triangle]); Capparelli et al. (2008 [triangle]); Charris et al. (2005 [triangle], 2007 [triangle]); Gilli et al. (1989 [triangle]); Kennard et al. (2003 [triangle]); Krivokolysko et al. (2002 [triangle]); Song et al. (2005 [triangle]); Tominaga et al. (1989 [triangle], 2002 [triangle]).

An external file that holds a picture, illustration, etc.
Object name is e-64-0o981-scheme1.jpg

Experimental

Crystal data

  • C17H14Cl2N2O3S2
  • M r = 429.32
  • Monoclinic, An external file that holds a picture, illustration, etc.
Object name is e-64-0o981-efi1.jpg
  • a = 11.6125 (7) Å
  • b = 10.1419 (6) Å
  • c = 16.4048 (10) Å
  • β = 100.926 (1)°
  • V = 1897.0 (2) Å3
  • Z = 4
  • Mo Kα radiation
  • μ = 0.58 mm−1
  • T = 296 (2) K
  • 0.29 × 0.22 × 0.17 mm

Data collection

  • Bruker SMART APEX diffractometer
  • Absorption correction: multi-scan (SADABS; Bruker, 2001 [triangle]) T min = 0.796, T max = 0.906
  • 12828 measured reflections
  • 4659 independent reflections
  • 3653 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
  • R int = 0.024

Refinement

  • R[F 2 > 2σ(F 2)] = 0.044
  • wR(F 2) = 0.119
  • S = 1.04
  • 4659 reflections
  • 237 parameters
  • H-atom parameters constrained
  • Δρmax = 0.58 e Å−3
  • Δρmin = −0.27 e Å−3

Data collection: SMART (Bruker, 2002 [triangle]); cell refinement: SAINT (Bruker, 2001 [triangle]); data reduction: SAINT; program(s) used to solve structure: SHELXS97 (Sheldrick, 2008 [triangle]); program(s) used to refine structure: SHELXL97 (Sheldrick, 2008 [triangle]); molecular graphics: ORTEP-3 (Farrugia, 1997 [triangle]); software used to prepare material for publication: WinGX (Farrugia, 1999 [triangle]) and PLATON (Spek, 2003 [triangle]).

Table 1
Hydrogen-bond geometry (Å, °)

Supplementary Material

Crystal structure: contains datablocks I, global. DOI: 10.1107/S160053680801252X/bg2184sup1.cif

Structure factors: contains datablocks I. DOI: 10.1107/S160053680801252X/bg2184Isup2.hkl

Additional supplementary materials: crystallographic information; 3D view; checkCIF report

Acknowledgments

Financial support from the Consejo de Desarrollo Científico y Humanístico of Universidad Central de Venezuela (CDCH-UCV), project PG 06–00–6502–2006, is gratefully acknowledged. We thank Dr Ángel Álvarez-Larena (Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona, Spain) for the X-ray diffraction data collection.

supplementary crystallographic information

Comment

The exploration of simple molecules with different functionalities for the synthesis of heterocycles is a worthwhile contribution to the chemistry of these compounds. The title compound (I), the 4''-methyl analogue (II) [see next paper: Capparelli et al., 2008)], and similar derivatives, have been used as effective synthons in the syntheses of some 1H-pyrrole-2,5-diones (Tominaga et al., 2002), pyrimidine derivatives (Tominaga et al., 1989) and 4H-1,4-benzothiazine-1,1-dioxides (Charris et al., 2005). We used (I) and (II) as starting materials to develop benzothiazine derivatives with antimalarial activity (Charris et al., 2007; Barazarte et al., 2008).

The X-ray structure determination showed that there is one molecule per asymmetric unit (Fig. 1), which displays E (trans) configuration about the C2═C3 double bond. A search of the Cambridge Structural Database (version 5.29, updated Jan 2008) (Allen, 2002) produced no structures with the same central fragment (i.e. excluding the phenyl rings) of (I) for proper comparison, but a search for the more restricted fragment X—C(CN)═C(SMe)-N(H)—Y gave three comparable structures, viz. TAKDOZ (Krivokolysko et al., 2002), AJULUM (Kennard et al., 2003) and DALVES (Song et al., 2005). Due to conjugation in the C3═C2—C1[equivalent]N1 moiety, the putative single bond C2—C1 shows a significant shortening, similar to the range 1.415 (7)–1.437 (4) Å observed in the aforementioned structures. Bond lengths (see Supplementary Materials) are in good agreement with the tabulated values (Allen et al., 1987), except C24—C25 (1.359 (4) Å), which is ca 0.02 Å shorter than expected.

The title compound displays a six-membered ring involving an intramolecular N—H···O(sulfonyl) bond (Table 1), which is an example of resonance-assisted hydrogen bonding (RAHB) (Gilli et al., 1989), as suggested by the ring bond lengths. Comparison with AJULUM and DALVES, which display similar rings [with N—H···O(carbonyl) and N—H···O(carboxyl) bonds respectively] and TAKDOZ, which does not have RAHB, reveal lengthenings of the C═C distances [AJULUM, 1.371 (2) Å; DALVES, 1.386 (7) Å; TAKDOZ, 1.345 (4) Å] and shortenings of the C—N bonds [AJULUM, 1.360 (2) Å; DALVES, 1.333 (6) Å; TAKDOZ, 1.404 (4) Å]. The situation is less clear in the S═O bond, with S1═O2 (involved in RAHB) just significantly longer than S1═O1. In addition to the RAHB ring, there is an N—H···Cl intramolecular bond. The molecular geometry also allows for a possible C4—H4b···Cg2 intramolecular interaction (Cg2: see below).

In the crystal structure (Fig. 2) bonds of the C—H···O(sulfonyl) type form chains that run along [1 0 1], while N—H···O(sulfonyl) bonds connect centrosymmetrycally related atoms of pairs of these chains, to form ribbons. Comparison of the N···O distances of the intra- and intermolecular N—H···O(sulfonyl) bonds reveals that the π-bond cooperativity results in a strengthening of the intramolecular hydrogen bond, as indicated by the significant shortening of the corresponding N···O distance. There are also π-π interactions between phenyl rings of pairs of centrosymmetrically related molecules, with Cg1···Cg2(2 - x, 1 - y, -z), 3.8612 (13) Å (Cgm: centroid of ring Cm1—Cm6, m = 1, 2).

Experimental

To a solution of 2,4-dichlorobenzenosulfonylacetonitrile (1.50 g, 6.1 mmol) and KOH (0.46 g, 8.1 mmol) in anhydrous dioxane (10 ml) at 0 °C, was added dropwise 3-methoxyphenylisothiocianate (1.00 g, 6.1 mmol) dissolved in anhydrous dioxane (3 ml). The resulting solution was stirred for 4 h at room temperature and then was added iodomethane (0.87 g, 6.1 mmol) and the mixture was stirred by 5 h at room temperature. The solvent was removed under reduced pressure and the residue was dissolved in dichloromethane (20 ml), washed with water, brine, dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated to dryness. The solid was purified by recrystallization from ethanol. Yield: 1.91 g (74%). Crystals suitable for X-ray analysis were obtained during the recrystallization.

The IR spectrum was determined on a Shimadzu model 470 spectrophotometer. IR data [KBr pellets, ν (cm-1)]: 3264 (NH), 2192 (CN), 1341 (SO2), 1133 (SO2).

The 1H NMR spectrum was recorded using a Jeol Eclipse 270 MHz [CDCl3/TMS, δ (p.p.m.), atomic numbering as in Fig. 1]: 2.21 (s, 3H, SCH3), 3.81 (s,3H, OCH3), 6.79 (d, 1H, H22; J: 2,2 Hz), 6.85 (dd, 2H, H24, H26; J: 8.1, 2.2 Hz), 7.30 (t, 1H, H25; 8.1 Hz), 7.43 (dd, 1H, H15; J: 8.4, 1.9 Hz), 7.55 (d, 1H, H13; J: 1.9 Hz), 8.13 (d, 1H, H16; J:8.4 Hz), 9.97 (brs, 1H, NH).

The elemental analysis was performed on a Perkin Elmer 2400 CHN analyzer; results (%) were within ±0.4 of predicted values. Calculated for C17H14N2O3S2Cl2: C, 47.55 H, 3.29 N, 6.52. Found: C, 47.55; H, 3.29; N, 6.52.

The melting point (uncorrected) was measured with a Fischer-Johns micro hot-stage apparatus: 136–138 °C.

Refinement

Hydrogen atoms were placed in calculated positions using a riding atom model with fixed C—H distances [0.86 Å for N, 0.93 Å for C(sp2), 0.96 Å for C(sp3)] and Uiso = p Ueq(parent atom) [p = 1.2 for N and C(sp2), 1.5 for C(sp3)].

Figures

Fig. 1.
Molecular structure of (I) showing the atomic numbering. Displacement ellipsoids are drawn at 50% probability level. Possible hydrogen bonds are shown as dashed lines.
Fig. 2.
Crystal structure of (I) viewed down the b axis. Possible hydrogen bonds are shown as dashed lines.

Crystal data

C17H14Cl2N2O3S2F000 = 880
Mr = 429.32Dx = 1.503 Mg m3
Monoclinic, P21/nMelting point = 409–411 K
Hall symbol: -P 2ynMo Kα radiation λ = 0.71073 Å
a = 11.6125 (7) ÅCell parameters from 3492 reflections
b = 10.1419 (6) Åθ = 2.4–28.1º
c = 16.4048 (10) ŵ = 0.58 mm1
β = 100.926 (1)ºT = 296 (2) K
V = 1897.0 (2) Å3Prism, colourless
Z = 40.29 × 0.22 × 0.17 mm

Data collection

Bruker SMART APEX diffractometer4659 independent reflections
Radiation source: fine-focus sealed tube3653 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Monochromator: graphiteRint = 0.024
Detector resolution: 8.13 pixels mm-1θmax = 29.1º
T = 296(2) Kθmin = 2.0º
[var phi] and ω scansh = −13→15
Absorption correction: multi-scan(SADABS; Bruker, 2001)k = −13→13
Tmin = 0.796, Tmax = 0.906l = −22→15
12828 measured reflections

Refinement

Refinement on F2Secondary atom site location: difference Fourier map
Least-squares matrix: fullHydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.044H-atom parameters constrained
wR(F2) = 0.119  w = 1/[σ2(Fo2) + (0.0578P)2 + 0.5461P] where P = (Fo2 + 2Fc2)/3
S = 1.04(Δ/σ)max = 0.001
4659 reflectionsΔρmax = 0.58 e Å3
237 parametersΔρmin = −0.27 e Å3
Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methodsExtinction correction: none

Special details

Geometry. All e.s.d.'s (except the e.s.d. in the dihedral angle between two l.s. planes) are estimated using the full covariance matrix. The cell e.s.d.'s are taken into account individually in the estimation of e.s.d.'s in distances, angles and torsion angles; correlations between e.s.d.'s in cell parameters are only used when they are defined by crystal symmetry. An approximate (isotropic) treatment of cell e.s.d.'s is used for estimating e.s.d.'s involving l.s. planes.
Refinement. Refinement of F2 against ALL reflections. The weighted R-factor wR and goodness of fit S are based on F2, conventional R-factors R are based on F, with F set to zero for negative F2. The threshold expression of F2 > σ(F2) is used only for calculating R-factors(gt) etc. and is not relevant to the choice of reflections for refinement. R-factors based on F2 are statistically about twice as large as those based on F, and R- factors based on ALL data will be even larger.

Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2)

xyzUiso*/Ueq
S10.77042 (4)0.46268 (5)0.02088 (3)0.03340 (13)
S20.90726 (5)0.19039 (6)0.21790 (4)0.05277 (17)
Cl10.95425 (5)0.66027 (6)0.13868 (5)0.0661 (2)
Cl20.62331 (7)1.02603 (7)0.11885 (6)0.0852 (3)
O10.66548 (12)0.40951 (15)−0.02832 (9)0.0479 (4)
O20.87384 (12)0.46887 (14)−0.01526 (9)0.0422 (3)
O31.2713 (2)−0.0272 (2)0.10486 (15)0.0869 (7)
N10.62151 (18)0.3565 (3)0.17764 (15)0.0692 (6)
N21.01127 (14)0.34675 (17)0.11897 (11)0.0432 (4)
H21.00730.41570.08800.052*
C110.73323 (15)0.62359 (19)0.04938 (11)0.0337 (4)
C120.81194 (16)0.7078 (2)0.09891 (13)0.0395 (4)
C130.77859 (19)0.8317 (2)0.11955 (14)0.0462 (5)
H130.83140.88720.15290.055*
C140.6645 (2)0.8717 (2)0.08946 (15)0.0500 (5)
C150.58494 (19)0.7912 (2)0.04044 (15)0.0524 (6)
H150.50860.82000.02140.063*
C160.61911 (17)0.6676 (2)0.01975 (13)0.0425 (5)
H160.56590.6132−0.01410.051*
C211.12266 (16)0.2827 (2)0.13590 (12)0.0381 (4)
C221.13568 (19)0.1547 (2)0.11007 (13)0.0462 (5)
H221.07150.10740.08220.055*
C231.2473 (2)0.0979 (2)0.12682 (15)0.0534 (6)
C241.3416 (2)0.1696 (3)0.16728 (16)0.0594 (7)
H241.41560.13110.17870.071*
C251.3275 (2)0.2962 (3)0.19075 (16)0.0573 (6)
H251.39210.34410.21740.069*
C261.21789 (19)0.3539 (2)0.17530 (14)0.0479 (5)
H261.20850.44060.19140.058*
C10.70534 (17)0.3590 (2)0.15151 (13)0.0433 (5)
C20.80432 (16)0.37253 (19)0.11286 (12)0.0352 (4)
C30.91295 (16)0.31489 (19)0.14429 (12)0.0351 (4)
C41.0420 (2)0.1996 (3)0.29231 (15)0.0709 (8)
H4B1.10410.16070.26920.106*
H4C1.03360.15270.34170.106*
H4A1.06040.29020.30580.106*
C51.1784 (4)−0.1029 (4)0.0621 (3)0.1160 (15)
H5B1.1195−0.11230.09560.174*
H5C1.2069−0.18840.05060.174*
H5A1.1452−0.05990.01090.174*

Atomic displacement parameters (Å2)

U11U22U33U12U13U23
S10.0278 (2)0.0382 (3)0.0323 (2)0.00214 (17)0.00072 (17)−0.00024 (18)
S20.0432 (3)0.0603 (4)0.0538 (3)0.0042 (2)0.0066 (2)0.0228 (3)
Cl10.0329 (3)0.0604 (4)0.0935 (5)0.0095 (2)−0.0169 (3)−0.0257 (3)
Cl20.0768 (5)0.0594 (4)0.1172 (7)0.0303 (3)0.0126 (4)−0.0190 (4)
O10.0398 (8)0.0511 (9)0.0462 (8)−0.0016 (7)−0.0088 (6)−0.0057 (7)
O20.0385 (7)0.0509 (8)0.0386 (8)0.0085 (6)0.0112 (6)0.0056 (6)
O30.0812 (14)0.0708 (13)0.1052 (17)0.0331 (11)0.0093 (12)−0.0160 (12)
N10.0398 (11)0.1008 (18)0.0705 (15)0.0078 (11)0.0196 (10)0.0213 (13)
N20.0305 (8)0.0460 (9)0.0531 (10)0.0094 (7)0.0075 (7)0.0172 (8)
C110.0270 (8)0.0384 (10)0.0349 (10)0.0035 (7)0.0041 (7)0.0024 (7)
C120.0291 (9)0.0442 (11)0.0435 (11)0.0048 (8)0.0024 (8)−0.0011 (8)
C130.0438 (11)0.0434 (12)0.0505 (13)0.0021 (9)0.0063 (9)−0.0060 (9)
C140.0502 (13)0.0426 (12)0.0590 (14)0.0156 (10)0.0149 (11)0.0019 (10)
C150.0348 (11)0.0563 (14)0.0642 (15)0.0155 (10)0.0045 (10)0.0072 (11)
C160.0294 (10)0.0494 (12)0.0459 (12)0.0042 (8)0.0002 (8)0.0047 (9)
C210.0315 (9)0.0460 (11)0.0371 (10)0.0083 (8)0.0070 (8)0.0083 (8)
C220.0419 (11)0.0503 (12)0.0445 (12)0.0029 (9)0.0036 (9)0.0009 (9)
C230.0580 (14)0.0526 (13)0.0506 (13)0.0206 (11)0.0126 (11)0.0014 (10)
C240.0366 (12)0.0815 (19)0.0593 (15)0.0201 (11)0.0074 (10)0.0067 (13)
C250.0351 (11)0.0728 (16)0.0597 (15)0.0007 (11)−0.0020 (10)0.0049 (12)
C260.0393 (11)0.0524 (13)0.0502 (13)0.0033 (9)0.0038 (9)0.0023 (10)
C10.0321 (10)0.0517 (12)0.0447 (12)0.0028 (9)0.0040 (8)0.0096 (9)
C20.0285 (9)0.0408 (10)0.0358 (10)0.0011 (7)0.0045 (7)0.0041 (8)
C30.0309 (9)0.0383 (10)0.0347 (10)0.0012 (7)0.0031 (7)0.0023 (8)
C40.0549 (15)0.113 (2)0.0428 (13)0.0180 (15)0.0042 (11)0.0260 (14)
C50.118 (3)0.073 (2)0.150 (4)0.002 (2)0.009 (3)−0.040 (2)

Geometric parameters (Å, °)

S1—O11.4333 (14)C15—H150.9300
S1—O21.4380 (14)C16—H160.9300
S1—C21.7443 (19)C21—C261.375 (3)
S1—C111.7733 (19)C21—C221.383 (3)
S2—C31.757 (2)C22—C231.397 (3)
S2—C41.795 (3)C22—H220.9300
Cl1—C121.7264 (19)C23—C241.375 (4)
Cl2—C141.732 (2)C24—C251.359 (4)
O3—C231.362 (3)C24—H240.9300
O3—C51.399 (4)C25—C261.380 (3)
N1—C11.136 (3)C25—H250.9300
N2—C31.327 (2)C26—H260.9300
N2—C211.427 (2)C1—C21.421 (3)
N2—H20.8600C2—C31.397 (3)
C11—C121.394 (3)C4—H4B0.9600
C11—C161.396 (2)C4—H4C0.9600
C12—C131.376 (3)C4—H4A0.9600
C13—C141.384 (3)C5—H5B0.9600
C13—H130.9300C5—H5C0.9600
C14—C151.373 (3)C5—H5A0.9600
C15—C161.377 (3)
O1—S1—O2118.14 (9)C21—C22—H22120.7
O1—S1—C2108.56 (9)C23—C22—H22120.7
O2—S1—C2108.08 (9)O3—C23—C24115.9 (2)
O1—S1—C11105.74 (9)O3—C23—C22124.1 (2)
O2—S1—C11109.43 (9)C24—C23—C22120.1 (2)
C2—S1—C11106.30 (9)C25—C24—C23120.6 (2)
C3—S2—C4106.78 (12)C25—C24—H24119.7
C23—O3—C5117.8 (2)C23—C24—H24119.7
C3—N2—C21129.07 (17)C24—C25—C26120.3 (2)
C3—N2—H2115.5C24—C25—H25119.8
C21—N2—H2115.5C26—C25—H25119.8
C12—C11—C16118.77 (18)C21—C26—C25119.7 (2)
C12—C11—S1123.49 (14)C21—C26—H26120.2
C16—C11—S1117.73 (15)C25—C26—H26120.2
C13—C12—C11121.26 (18)N1—C1—C2173.9 (2)
C13—C12—Cl1117.11 (16)C3—C2—C1123.04 (18)
C11—C12—Cl1121.62 (15)C3—C2—S1125.34 (15)
C12—C13—C14118.3 (2)C1—C2—S1111.57 (14)
C12—C13—H13120.8N2—C3—C2123.57 (17)
C14—C13—H13120.8N2—C3—S2122.47 (14)
C15—C14—C13121.8 (2)C2—C3—S2113.91 (14)
C15—C14—Cl2120.62 (17)S2—C4—H4B109.5
C13—C14—Cl2117.50 (18)S2—C4—H4C109.5
C14—C15—C16119.48 (19)H4B—C4—H4C109.5
C14—C15—H15120.3S2—C4—H4A109.5
C16—C15—H15120.3H4B—C4—H4A109.5
C15—C16—C11120.3 (2)H4C—C4—H4A109.5
C15—C16—H16119.8O3—C5—H5B109.5
C11—C16—H16119.8O3—C5—H5C109.5
C26—C21—C22120.81 (19)H5B—C5—H5C109.5
C26—C21—N2118.09 (19)O3—C5—H5A109.5
C22—C21—N2121.03 (18)H5B—C5—H5A109.5
C21—C22—C23118.5 (2)H5C—C5—H5A109.5
O1—S1—C11—C12179.07 (17)C5—O3—C23—C220.7 (4)
O2—S1—C11—C12−52.70 (19)C21—C22—C23—O3179.8 (2)
C2—S1—C11—C1263.80 (19)C21—C22—C23—C24−0.8 (3)
O1—S1—C11—C16−1.47 (18)O3—C23—C24—C25179.0 (2)
O2—S1—C11—C16126.77 (16)C22—C23—C24—C25−0.5 (4)
C2—S1—C11—C16−116.74 (16)C23—C24—C25—C260.9 (4)
C16—C11—C12—C130.8 (3)C22—C21—C26—C25−1.3 (3)
S1—C11—C12—C13−179.76 (17)N2—C21—C26—C25−178.4 (2)
C16—C11—C12—Cl1179.47 (16)C24—C25—C26—C210.0 (4)
S1—C11—C12—Cl1−1.1 (3)O1—S1—C2—C3128.18 (18)
C11—C12—C13—C14−0.4 (3)O2—S1—C2—C3−1.1 (2)
Cl1—C12—C13—C14−179.12 (18)C11—S1—C2—C3−118.48 (18)
C12—C13—C14—C150.3 (4)O1—S1—C2—C1−49.26 (17)
C12—C13—C14—Cl2178.07 (18)O2—S1—C2—C1−178.53 (15)
C13—C14—C15—C16−0.6 (4)C11—S1—C2—C164.08 (17)
Cl2—C14—C15—C16−178.30 (18)C21—N2—C3—C2−169.2 (2)
C14—C15—C16—C111.0 (3)C21—N2—C3—S28.0 (3)
C12—C11—C16—C15−1.1 (3)C1—C2—C3—N2−166.4 (2)
S1—C11—C16—C15179.43 (17)S1—C2—C3—N216.5 (3)
C3—N2—C21—C26−120.4 (2)C1—C2—C3—S216.2 (3)
C3—N2—C21—C2262.5 (3)S1—C2—C3—S2−160.99 (12)
C26—C21—C22—C231.7 (3)C4—S2—C3—N237.0 (2)
N2—C21—C22—C23178.65 (19)C4—S2—C3—C2−145.56 (17)
C5—O3—C23—C24−178.8 (3)

Hydrogen-bond geometry (Å, °)

D—H···AD—HH···AD···AD—H···A
N2—H2···O20.862.142.756 (2)129
N2—H2···O2i0.862.313.005 (2)138
N2—H2···Cl10.862.723.2763 (18)123
C4—H4C···O1ii0.962.463.215 (3)135
C16—H16···O10.932.402.815 (3)107
C4—H4B···Cg20.962.743.501 (3)137

Symmetry codes: (i) −x+2, −y+1, −z; (ii) x+1/2, −y+1/2, z+1/2.

Footnotes

Supplementary data and figures for this paper are available from the IUCr electronic archives (Reference: BG2184).

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