PMCCPMCCPMCC

Search tips
Search criteria 

Advanced

 
Logo of jcinvestThe Journal of Clinical InvestigationCurrent IssueArchiveSubscriptionAbout the Journal
 
J Clin Invest. Oct 1971; 50(10): 2079–2083.
PMCID: PMC292141
Immunologic differentiation of primary hyperparathyroidism from hyperparathyroidism due to nonparathyroid cancer
B. Lawrence Riggs, Claude D. Arnaud, James C. Reynolds, and Lynwood H. Smith
Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation: Division of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, University of Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota 55901
Department of Endocrine Research, University of Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota 55901
Division of Nephrology and Internal Medicine, University of Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota 55901
Mayo Graduate School of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota 55901
Abstract
Serum immunoreactive parathyroid hormone (IPTH) was measured by radioimmunoassay in 54 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and in 18 consecutive patients with ectopic hyperparathyroidism due to nonparathyroid cancer without apparent skeletal metastasis. Although serum calcium concentration was higher in the group with ectopic hyperparathyroidism, serum IPTH was lower (rank sum test, P < 0.001) and was undetectable in eight. A second anti-PTH antiserum also differentiated between IPTH in the two groups, although IPTH was undetectable in only 1 of 14 sera. When IPTH values in serial dilutions were plotted, slopes for the two patients with ectopic hyperparathyroidism who had relatively high IPTH were less (P < 0.001) than slopes for standard hyperparathyroid sera. By using differences in either IPTH rank or slope of the dilutional curve of sera, primary hyperparathyroidism could be excluded as a cause of the hypercalcemia in 16 of the 18 patients with ectopic hyperparathyroidism. The data are interpreted as indicating that PTH-like material in the serum of these patients with ectopic hyperparathyroidism is immunologically different from the PTH in the serum of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism.
Full text
Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (766K), or click on a page image below to browse page by page.
Articles from The Journal of Clinical Investigation are provided here courtesy of
American Society for Clinical Investigation