PMCCPMCCPMCC

Search tips
Search criteria 

Advanced

 
Logo of jcinvestThe Journal of Clinical InvestigationCurrent IssueArchiveSubscriptionAbout the Journal
 
J Clin Invest. Dec 1993; 92(6): 2626–2632.
PMCID: PMC288459
Potential role for interleukin-10 in the immunosuppression associated with kala azar.
B J Holaday, M M Pompeu, S Jeronimo, M J Texeira, A de A Sousa, A W Vasconcelos, R D Pearson, J S Abrams, and R M Locksley
Department of Medicine and Microbiology/Immunology, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine 94143.
Abstract
Patients with acute kala azar are generally nonreactive in a number of immunologic assays, including T cell proliferation and generation of macrophage-activating cytokines, principally IFN-gamma, in response to leishmania antigens in vitro. To test for potential immunosuppressive factors, a series of T cell lines and clones were established from patients with acute kala azar, from patients after chemotherapy for kala azar, and from skin test-positive adults from the same endemic region. Although CD4+ T cell lines and clones could be readily established from the skin test-positive adults, lines and clones from acute or treated patients were heavily biased in expression of CD8+. The CD8+ cells from acute patients did not themselves release cytokines in response to leishmania antigens in vitro, but markedly affected the cytokine profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated 1 yr later after recovery. Addition of the CD8+ cells caused inhibition of lymphoproliferation and IFN-gamma release, with augmentation of IL-6 and IL-10 release. The inhibitory effects of the CD8+ cells could be partially abrogated by antibodies to IL-10 but not by antibodies to IL-4. Analysis of four patients with acute kala azar demonstrated release of IL-10 that could not be demonstrated in supernatants from asymptomatic skin test-positive individuals. Generation of IL-10 may contribute to the profound suppression of IFN-gamma release that occurs during kala azar due to Leishmania chagasi.
Full text
Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (1.4M), or click on a page image below to browse page by page.
Images in this article
Click on the image to see a larger version.
Articles from The Journal of Clinical Investigation are provided here courtesy of
American Society for Clinical Investigation