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Br J Gen Pract. 2010 April 1; 60(573): e171–e179.
PMCID: PMC2845508

Place of death for the ‘oldest old’: ≥85-year-olds in the CC75C population-based cohort

Jane Fleming, PhD, Research Nurse
Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge
Jun Zhao, MSc, Computer Officer
Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge
Morag Farquhar, PhD, Post-Doctoral Research Fellow
General Practice and Primary Care Research Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge
Carol Brayne, MD, Professor of Public Health
Institute of Public Health and Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge
Stephen Barclay, MD, Post-Doctoral Research Fellow
General Practice and Primary Care Research Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge
the Cambridge City over-75s Cohort (CC75C) study collaboration

Abstract

Background

Deaths are rising fastest among the oldest old but data on their transitions in place of care at the end of life are scarce.

Aim

To examine the place of residence or care of ≥85 year-olds less than a year before death, and their place of death, and to map individual changes between the two.

Design of study

Population-based cohort study.

Setting

Cambridge City over-75s Cohort (CC75C) study, UK.

Method

Retrospective analysis of prospective data from males and females aged ≥85 years at death who died within a year of taking part in any CC75C survey (n = 320); death certificate linkage.

Results

Only 7% changed their address in their last year of life, yet 52% died somewhere other than their usual address at the time of death. Over two-thirds were living in the community when interviewed <1 year before death, but less than one-third who had lived at home died there (less than one-fifth in sheltered housing). Care homes were the usual address of most people dying there (77% in residential homes, 87% in nursing homes) but 15% of deaths in acute hospital came from care homes.

Conclusion

More than half the study sample of individuals of advanced old age had a change in their place of residence or care in their last year of life. These findings add weight to calls for improved end-of-life care in all settings, regardless of age, to avoid unnecessary transfers. The study data provide a baseline that can help plan and monitor initiatives to promote choice in location of care at the end of life for the very old.

Keywords: aged, aged 80 or over, aging in place, frail elderly, terminal care

Articles from The British Journal of General Practice are provided here courtesy of Royal College of General Practitioners