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Postgrad Med J. 1996 October; 72(852): 599–604.
PMCID: PMC2398608

The sleepwalking/night terrors syndrome in adults.

Abstract

A third of a million adults in the UK sleepwalk while a million suffer from night terrors. In both conditions the individual is unaware of the fullness of their surroundings and is totally focussed in their concern or activity. Doctors are only likely to become involved if the individual comes to harm or seeks help or if other people are inconvenienced or threatened. The constitutional basis of the disorder is beyond doubt, although the actual expression may be related to stressful life-events resulting from an individual's personality, relationships and circumstances. Treatment may include the provision of a secure environment, counselling, and the use of benzodiazepines and serotonin re-uptake inhibitors.

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Selected References

These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article.
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