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Br J Cancer. 1999 February; 79(3-4): 658–665.
PMCID: PMC2362441

Patterns of care and survival for adolescents and young adults with acute leukaemia – a population-based study

Abstract

We report a population-based study of patterns of care and survival for people with acute leukaemia diagnosed at age 15–29 years during 1984–94 in regions of England and Wales covered by specialist leukaemia registries. There were 879 patients: 417 with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and 462 with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). For ALL, actuarial survival rates were 43% at 5 years after diagnosis and 37% at 10 years. Survival improved significantly between 1984–88 and 1989–94 for those aged 15–19 at diagnosis. Patients entered in national clinical trials and those not entered had similar survival rates. Survival rates were similar at teaching and non-teaching hospitals and at hospitals treating different numbers of study patients per year. For AML, survival rates were 42% at 5 years after diagnosis and 39% at 10 years. Survival improved significantly between 1984–88 and 1989–94. Patients entered in the Medical Research Council AML10 trial had a higher survival rate than those who were in the earlier AML9 trial. Survival did not vary with category of hospital. We conclude that survival has improved for adolescents and young adults with acute leukaemia but that there is at present no evidence that centralized treatment results in a survival benefit for patients in this age group. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign

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Selected References

These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article.
  • Taylor Irving. Problems of site specific cancer specialisation. BMJ. 1996 Nov 09;313(7066):1213–1213. [PMC free article]

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