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J Cell Biol. 1991 February 2; 112(4): 535–544.
PMCID: PMC2288849

Cellular morphogenesis in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle: localization of the CDC3 gene product and the timing of events at the budding site

Abstract

Budding cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae possess a ring of 10-nm-diameter filaments, of unknown biochemical nature, that lies just inside the plasma membrane in the neck connecting the mother cell to its bud. Electron microscopic observations suggest that these filaments assemble at the budding site coincident with bud emergence and disassemble shortly before cytokinesis (Byers, B. and L. Goetsch. 1976. J. Cell Biol. 69:717-721). Mutants defective in any of four genes (CDC3, CDC10, CDC11, or CDC12) lack these filaments and display a pleiotropic phenotype that involves abnormal bud growth and an inability to complete cytokinesis. We showed previously by immunofluorescence that the CDC12 gene product is probably a constituent of the ring of 10-nm filaments (Haarer, B. and J. Pringle. 1987. Mol. Cell. Biol. 7:3678-3687). We now report the use of fusion proteins to generate polyclonal antibodies specific for the CDC3 gene product. In immunofluorescence experiments, these antibodies decorated the neck regions of wild-type and mutant cells in patterns suggesting that the CDC3 gene product is also a constituent of the ring of 10-nm filaments. We also used the CDC3-specific and CDC12-specific antibodies to investigate the timing of localization of these proteins to the budding site. The results suggest that the CDC3 protein is organized into a ring at the budding site well before bud emergence and remains so organized for some time after cytokinesis. The CDC12 product appears to behave similarly, but may arrive at the budding site closer to the time of bud emergence, and disappear from that site more quickly after cytokinesis, than does the CDC3 product. Examination of mating cells and cells responding to purified mating pheromone revealed novel arrangements of the CDC3 and CDC12 products in the regions of cell wall reorganization. Both proteins were present in normal-looking ring structures at the bases of the first zygotic buds.

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Selected References

These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article.
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