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Logo of jroyalcgpracBJGP at RCGPBJGP at PubMed CentralJ R Coll Gen Pract at PubMed CentralRCGP homepage
 
J R Coll Gen Pract. 1978 May; 28(190): 288–291.
PMCID: PMC2158600

The rise of the general practitioner in the nineteenth century

Abstract

It was the Apothecaries Act of 1815 which led to the emergence of general practice as we know it today and it was this one Act which produced a flood of changes on the medical scene that are without parallel in our history. Students were soon to undergo new forms of training in new medical schools and hospitals, and many medical associations and journals were founded. The term `general practitioner' was soon in use. The driving force behind all these changes was the Society of Apothecaries and the new general practitioners, and all too often they were opposed by the two Royal Colleges. It was only at the beginning of the twentieth century that these new practitioners were allowed to call themselves `doctors'.

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Selected References

These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article.
  • McConaghey RM. Proposals to found a Royal College of General Practitioners in the nineteenth century. J R Coll Gen Pract. 1972 Nov;22(124):775–788. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
  • ROBERTS RS. THE PERSONNEL AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE IN TUDOR AND STUART ENGLAND. II. LONDON. Med Hist. 1964 Jul;8:217–234. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
  • McManus IC, Lockwood DN, Cruickshank JK. The preregistration year: Chaos by consensus. Lancet. 1977 Feb 19;1(8008):413–417. [PubMed]

Articles from The Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners are provided here courtesy of Royal College of General Practitioners