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Logo of jroyalcgpracBJGP at RCGPBJGP at PubMed CentralJ R Coll Gen Pract at PubMed CentralRCGP homepage
 
J R Coll Gen Pract. 1986 December; 36(293): 547–548.
PMCID: PMC1960673

A search for subclinical infection during a small outbreak of whooping cough: implications for clinical diagnosis

Abstract

The transmission of whooping cough in a general practice community was followed after the identification of the first case for nearly three years. Intensive case-finding was undertaken to detect contacts of known cases of whooping cough and to take pernasal swabs from those with any cough; 102 swabs were taken. In three months 39 cases of whooping cough were clinically diagnosed, 17 (44%) of which were confirmed bacteriologically. All had a prolonged paroxysmal cough, one-third reported a catarrhal phase, 18 (46%) vomited with paroxysms and nine (23%) whooped. No isolations of Bordetella pertussis were obtained from the 84 contacts with non-paroxysmal coughs. There was no evidence that subclinical bordetella infection (showing none of the signs of whooping cough) is a common occurrence.

It is probable that many recognizable cases of whooping cough are missed because it can be a milder illness than is often realized and commonly exhibits neither whooping, vomiting nor a catarrhal phase. Paroxysms may be infrequent. The diagnosis of whooping cough should be suspected from a prolonged paroxysmal cough alone.

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Selected References

These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article.
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  • Linnemann CC, Jr, Bass JW, Smith MH. The carrier state in pertussis. Am J Epidemiol. 1968 Nov;88(3):422–427. [PubMed]
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Articles from The Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners are provided here courtesy of Royal College of General Practitioners