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Logo of neuroncolAboutAuthor GuidelinesEditorial BoardNeuro-Oncology
 
Neuro Oncol. 2002 April; 4(2): 86–94.
PMCID: PMC1920657

A chromosomal region 7p11.2 transcript map: its development and application to the study of EGFR amplicons in glioblastoma.

Abstract

Cumulative information available about the organization of amplified chromosomal regions in human tumors suggests that the amplification repeat units, or amplicons, can be of a simple or complex nature. For the former, amplified regions generally retain their native chromosomal configuration and involve a single amplification target sequence. For complex amplicons, amplified DNAs usually undergo substantial reorganization relative to the normal chromosomal regions from which they evolve, and the regions subject to amplification may contain multiple target sequences. Previous efforts to characterize the 7p11.2 epidermal growth factor receptor ) amplicon in glioblastoma have relied primarily on the use of markers positioned by linkage analysis and/or radiation hybrid mapping, both of which are known to have the potential for being inaccurate when attempting to order loci over relatively short (<1 Mb) chromosomal regions. Due to the limited resolution of genetic maps that have been established through the use of these approaches, we have constructed a 2-Mb bacterial and P1-derived artificial chromosome (BAC-PAC) contig for the EGFR region and have applied markers positioned on its associated physical map to the analysis of 7p11.2 amplifications in a series of glioblastomas. Our data indicate that EGFR is the sole amplification target within the mapped region, although there are several additional 7p11.2 genes that can be coamplified and overexpressed with EGFR. Furthermore, these results are consistent with EGFR amplicons retaining the same organization as the native chromosome 7p11.2 region from which they are derived.


Articles from Neuro-Oncology are provided here courtesy of Society for Neuro-Oncology and Oxford University Press