PMCCPMCCPMCC

Search tips
Search criteria 

Advanced

 
Logo of pubhealthrepLink to Publisher's site
 
Public Health Rep. 2001; 116(Suppl 1): 32–40.
PMCID: PMC1913684
The National Birth Defects Prevention Study.
P. W. Yoon, S. A. Rasmussen, M. C. Lynberg, C. A. Moore, M. Anderka, S. L. Carmichael, P. Costa, C. Druschel, C. A. Hobbs, P. A. Romitti, P. H. Langlois, and L. D. Edmonds
National Center for Environmental Health, Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30341-3724, USA.
Abstract
The National Birth Defects Prevention Study was designed to identify infants with major birth defects and evaluate genetic and environmental factors associated with the occurrence of birth defects. The ongoing case-control study covers an annual birth population of 482,000 and includes cases identified from birth defect surveillance registries in eight states. Infants used as controls are randomly selected from birth certificates or birth hospital records. Mothers of case and control infants are interviewed and parents are asked to collect buccal cells from themselves and their infants for DNA testing. Information gathered from the interviews and the DNA specimens will be used to study independent genetic and environmental factors and gene-environment interactions for a broad range of birth defects. As of December 2000, 7,470 cases and 3,821 controls had been ascertained in the eight states. Interviews had been completed with 70% of the eligible case and control mothers, buccal cell collection had begun in all of the study sites, and researchers were developing analysis plans for the compiled data. This study is the largest and broadest collaborative effort ever conducted among the nation's leading birth defect researchers. The unprecedented statistical power that will result from this study will enable scientists to study the epidemiology of some rare birth defects for the first time. The compiled interview data and banked DNA of approximately 35 categories of birth defects will facilitate future research as new hypotheses and improved technologies emerge.
Full text
Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (4.0M), or click on a page image below to browse page by page.
Articles from Public Health Reports are provided here courtesy of
Association of Schools of Public Health