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Logo of arthrestherBioMed Centralbiomed central web sitesearchsubmit a manuscriptregisterthis articleArthritis Research & Therapy
 
Arthritis Res Ther. 2006; 8(4): 110.
Published online 2006 June 22. doi:  10.1186/ar1987
PMCID: PMC1779402

The RNA interference pathway: a new target for autoimmunity

Abstract

Many intracellular macromolecular complexes that are involved in the production or degradation of RNAs are targeted by autoantibodies in systemic autoimmune diseases. RNA interference (RNAi) is a recently characterized gene silencing pathway by which specific mRNAs are either degraded or translationally suppressed. In a recent issue of Arthritis Research and Therapy, Andrew Jakymiw and colleagues reported that the enigmatic Su autoantigen complex contains key components of the RNAi machinery. Anti-Su autoantibodies from both human patients with rheumatic diseases and a mouse model of autoimmunity recognize the endonucleolytic Argonaute and Dicer proteins, both crucial enzymes of the RNAi pathway. These data raise the question of how the anti-Su response is triggered. So far, it is unknown whether molecular modifications may be involved, as has been proposed for other intracellular autoantigens. The implication of RNAi in anti-viral defence may suggest a role for virus infection in this process.


Articles from Arthritis Research & Therapy are provided here courtesy of BioMed Central