PMCCPMCCPMCC

Search tips
Search criteria 

Advanced

 
Logo of heartHeartCurrent TOCInstructions to authors
 
Heart. Mar 1999; 81(3): 276–277.
PMCID: PMC1728955
Pregnancy after atrial repair for transposition of the great arteries
M Genoni, R Jenni, S Hoerstrup, P Vogt, and M Turina
Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland.
OBJECTIVE—To investigate the risk of pregnancy in patients with transposition of the great arteries (TGA) who have undergone atrial repair.
DESIGN—Retrospective analysis (1962-94) of 342 TGA patients who underwent atrial repair. Of 231 known late survivors, 48 were women over 18 years old who were interviewed about possible reproductive plans and previous pregnancies. As a control, comparison was made with data of 57 500 women (mean age 26 years) obtained from the Swiss Statistical Bank in Bern.
RESULTS—Mean follow up was 13.7 years; 66% remained asymptomatic, 29% had mild to moderate cardiac symptoms, and 5% suffered from severe cardiac symptoms (New York Heart Association grade III-IV). Thirty six of the 48 women wished to bear children and, to date, there have been 10 live births, two spontaneous first trimester abortions, and one induced abortion at 16 weeks. During pregnancy there was one case of cardiac deterioration and two cases of pneumonia. There was no evidence of congenital heart disease in the children.
CONCLUSIONS—In this relatively small series the completion of pregnancy in women with TGA who had undergone atrial repair and who had normal functional cardiac status was uncomplicated

Keywords: congenital heart disease; pregnancy; transposition of the great arteries; atrial repair
Figure 1
Figure 1  
Actuarial survival following atrial repair for transposition of the great arteries (n = 231 surviving patients); Kaplan-Meier analysis.
Figure 2
Figure 2  
Marital status and births: comparison of women who had undergone atrial repair with a control group consisting of 26 year old women living in Switzerland in 1993. 
Articles from Heart are provided here courtesy of
BMJ Group