PMCCPMCCPMCC

Search tips
Search criteria 

Advanced

 
Logo of envhperEnvironmental Health PerspectivesBrowse ArticlesAbout EHPGeneral InformationAuthorsMediaProgramsPartnerships
 
Environ Health Perspect. Jul 1998; 106(7): 375–384.
PMCID: PMC1533135
Research Article
Oxidative stress in toxicology: established mammalian and emerging piscine model systems.
K A Kelly, C M Havrilla, T C Brady, K H Abramo, and E D Levin
Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA.
Abstract
Interest in the toxicological aspects of oxidative stress has grown in recent years, and research has become increasingly focused on the mechanistic aspects of oxidative damage and cellular responses in biological systems. Toxic consequences of oxidative stress at the subcellular level include lipid peroxidation and oxidative damage to DNA and proteins. These effects are often used as end points in the study of oxidative stress. Typically, mammalian species have been used as models to study oxidative stress and to elucidate the mechanisms underlying cellular damage and response, largely because of the interest in human health issues surrounding oxidative stress. However, it is becoming apparent that oxidative stress also affects aquatic organisms exposed to environmental pollutants. Research in fish has demonstrated that mammalian and piscine systems exhibit similar toxicological and adaptive responses to oxidative stress. This suggests that piscine models, in addition to traditional mammalian models, may be useful for further understanding the mechanisms underlying the oxidative stress response.
Full text
Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (3.5M), or click on a page image below to browse page by page.
Images in this article
Click on the image to see a larger version.
Articles from Environmental Health Perspectives are provided here courtesy of
National Institute of Environmental Health Science