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Public Health Rep. 1986 Nov-Dec; 101(6): 599–606.
PMCID: PMC1477684
Hypertension knowledge, attitudes, and behavior: 1985 NHIS findings.
E J Roccella, A E Bowler, M V Ames, and M J Horan
Abstract
Data from the Health Promotion/Disease Prevention Supplement to the 1985 National Health Interview Survey provide an indication of progress made toward achieving the 1990 objectives for the nation. Survey results showed remarkably high levels of knowledge concerning the increased risks associated with uncontrolled high blood pressure. Nine of 10 adults in the United States knew that high blood pressure increases the risk of heart disease, and 3 of 4 knew that high blood pressure is the most significant risk factor for stroke. The majority of both the general public and the subgroup of the population identified as hypertensives reported knowing the results of their last blood pressure measurement; and, most importantly, almost two-thirds of the identified hypertensives reported that their pressures were under control at last measurement. Data examining professional advice, given and acted upon to achieve blood pressure goals, show that almost two-thirds of the hypertensives currently report taking antihypertensive medication. Results also suggest a degree of willingness by both professionals and hypertensives to attempt nondrug approaches to controlling pressures. The large majority of hypertensives who were advised by a health professional to cut down on sodium, lose weight, and exercise reported they were following this advice. These findings will be used to further refine high blood pressure education strategies and advance the progress toward meeting the 1990 hypertension objectives.
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