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J R Soc Med. 1999 October; 92(10): 525–528.
PMCID: PMC1297393

Family support in general practice.

Abstract

At a time when social services are overburdened in Britain, family support in general practice offers one way to fill the gap. In the Well Family Project, a 'family support coordinator' worked within a general practice in Hackney, London. In the first eighteen months she saw 113 clients. Evaluation was by semistructured interviews with a sample of these clients and with professional workers. Comments from those interviewed indicate that the family support was valued. The general practice base was convenient and non-stigmatizing. By adopting a proactive approach, the project was able to work with clients who had previously 'slipped through the net'. Some of the professionals interviewed would have liked to provide the same help, but were unable to do so because of time and other constraints. Family support provided through general practice was well received by vulnerable families. Although there was overlap with the remit of health visitors and social workers, the protected time and the independence of the coordinator enabled clients to obtain the help they wanted. The replicability of this strategy now needs to be assessed.

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Selected References

These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article.
  • House JS, Landis KR, Umberson D. Social relationships and health. Science. 1988 Jul 29;241(4865):540–545. [PubMed]
  • Davis H, Spurr P. Parent counselling: an evaluation of a community child mental health service. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1998 Mar;39(3):365–376. [PubMed]
  • Gordon J, Robertson R, Swan M. 'Babies don't come with a set of instructions': running support groups for mothers. Health Visit. 1995 Apr;68(4):155–156. [PubMed]

Articles from Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine are provided here courtesy of Royal Society of Medicine Press