PMCCPMCCPMCC

Search tips
Search criteria 

Advanced

 
Logo of hsresearchLink to Publisher's site
 
Health Serv Res. 1978 Spring; 13(1): 3–15.
PMCID: PMC1072026

Infant mortality in SMSAs before Medicaid: test of a causal model.

Abstract

Path analysis is applied to data on infant mortality, supplies of physicians and hospital beds, and population percentages of blacks and low-income families in 201 standard metropolitan statistical areas (SMSAs) to test the hypothesis that medical resources mediate the effects of racial composition and low income on infant mortality rates. The hypothesis is not supported for the SMSA data: direct effects of racial composition and low income on infant mortality are stronger than indirect effects. The use of SMSA data for analysis is contrasted with the use of county data in a discussion of study by Anderson, from which the hypothesis was drawn.

Full text

Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (1.3M), or click on a page image below to browse page by page. Links to PubMed are also available for Selected References.

Selected References

These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article.
  • Anderson JG. Causal models and social indicators: toward the development of social systems models. Am Sociol Rev. 1973 Jun;38(3):285–301. [PubMed]
  • Joroff S, Navarro V. Medical manpower: a multivariate analysis of the distribution of physicians in urban United States. Med Care. 1971 Sep-Oct;9(5):428–438. [PubMed]
  • Marden PG. A demographic and ecological analysis of the distribution of physicians in metropolitan America, 1960. AJS. 1966 Nov;72(3):290–300. [PubMed]
  • Reskin B, Campbell FL. Physician distribution across metropolitan areas. AJS. 1974 Jan;79(4):981–998. [PubMed]
  • Bice TW, Rabin DL, Starfield BH, White KL. Economic class and use of physician services. Med Care. 1973 Jul-Aug;11(4):287–296. [PubMed]
  • Monteiro LA. Expense is no object: income and physician visits reconsidered. J Health Soc Behav. 1973 Jun;14(2):99–115. [PubMed]
  • Donabedian A. Effects of MEDICARE and MEDICAID on access to and quality of health care. Public Health Rep. 1976 Jul-Aug;91(4):322–331. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
  • Wilson RW, White EL. Changes in morbidity, disability, and utilization differentials between the poor and the nonpoor: data from the health interview survey: 1964 and 1973. Med Care. 1977 Aug;15(8):636–646. [PubMed]
  • STOCKWELL EG. Infant mortality and socio-economic status: a changing relationship. Milbank Mem Fund Q. 1962 Jan;40:101–111. [PubMed]
  • Donabedian A, Rosenfeld LS, Southern EM. Infant mortality and socioeconomic status in a metropolitan community. Public Health Rep. 1965 Dec;80(12):1083–1094. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
  • HAMMOUD EI. STUDIES IN FETAL AND INFANT MORTALITY. I. A METHODOLOGICAL APPROACH TO THE DEFINITION OF PERINATAL MORTALITY. Am J Public Health Nations Health. 1965 Jul;55:1012–1023. [PubMed]
  • Rushing WA, Wade GT. Community-structure constraints on distribution of physicians. Health Serv Res. 1973 Winter;8(4):283–297. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
  • Brooks CH. Path analysis of socioeconomic correlates of county infant mortality rates. Int J Health Serv. 1975;5(3):499–514. [PubMed]
  • Brooks CH. The changing relationship between socioeconomic status and infant mortality: an analysis of state characteristics. J Health Soc Behav. 1975 Sep;16(3):291–303. [PubMed]
  • Elesh D, Schollaert PT. Race and urban medicine: factors affecting the distribution of physicians in Chicago. J Health Soc Behav. 1972 Sep;13(3):236–250. [PubMed]
  • Kane RL. Determination of health care priorities and expectations among rural consumers. Health Serv Res. 1969 Summer;4(2):142–151. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

Articles from Health Services Research are provided here courtesy of Health Research & Educational Trust