PMCCPMCCPMCC

Search tips
Search criteria 

Advanced

 
Logo of jepicomhJournal of Epidemiology and Community HealthVisit this articleSubmit a manuscriptReceive email alertsContact usBMJ
 
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1996 April; 50(2): 149–155.
PMCID: PMC1060243

The effects of illness on quality of life: findings from a survey of households in Great Britain.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE: To obtain national population norms on pertinent domains of quality of life, and the relative importance of these domains to people with reported longstanding illness. DESIGN AND SETTING: The vehicle for the study was the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys omnibus survey in Great Britain. The sampling frame was the British postcode address file of "small users", stratified by region and socioeconomic factors. This file includes all private household addresses. The postal sectors are selected with probability proportional to size. Within each sector 30 addresses are selected randomly with an target size of 2000 adults. PARTICIPANTS: The total number of adults interviewed was 2033 (one per sampled household), resulting in 2031 usable questionnaires, and representing a response rate of 77%. MAIN RESULTS: Of those who reported a longstanding illness, the most common, freely mentioned, first most important effects of the longstanding illness on their lives were (in order of frequency) ability to get out and about/stand/walk/go out shopping, being able to work/find a job, and effects on social life/leisure activities. Analysis of the areas of life affected by longstanding illness, showed considerable variation in relation to the condition. For example, respondents with mental health disorders (mainly depression) were most likely to report as the first most important effect the availability of work/ability to work, followed by social life/leisure activities; respondents with digestive and endocrine (for example, diabetes) disorders were most likely to report dietary restrictions; while respondents with cardiovascular disease, respiratory, and musculoskeletal disorders were most likely to report ability to get out and about/stand/walk/go out shopping. CONCLUSIONS: These results support the current trend of developing disease specific health related quality of life questionnaires rather than using generic scales.

Full text

Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (1.2M), or click on a page image below to browse page by page. Links to PubMed are also available for Selected References.

Selected References

These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article.
  • Chambers LW, Macdonald LA, Tugwell P, Buchanan WW, Kraag G. The McMaster Health Index Questionnaire as a measure of quality of life for patients with rheumatoid disease. J Rheumatol. 1982 Sep-Oct;9(5):780–784. [PubMed]
  • Bergner M, Bobbitt RA, Kressel S, Pollard WE, Gilson BS, Morris JR. The sickness impact profile: conceptual formulation and methodology for the development of a health status measure. Int J Health Serv. 1976;6(3):393–415. [PubMed]
  • NEUGARTEN BL, HAVIGHURST RJ, TOBIN SS. The measurement of life satisfaction. J Gerontol. 1961 Apr;16:134–143. [PubMed]
  • Zautra A, Goodhart D. Quality of life indicators: a review of the literature. Community Ment Health Rev. 1979 Spring;4(1):1–10. [PubMed]
  • O'Boyle CA, McGee H, Hickey A, O'Malley K, Joyce CR. Individual quality of life in patients undergoing hip replacement. Lancet. 1992 May 2;339(8801):1088–1091. [PubMed]
  • Guyatt GH, Berman LB, Townsend M, Pugsley SO, Chambers LW. A measure of quality of life for clinical trials in chronic lung disease. Thorax. 1987 Oct;42(10):773–778. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
  • Guyatt G, Mitchell A, Irvine EJ, Singer J, Williams N, Goodacre R, Tompkins C. A new measure of health status for clinical trials in inflammatory bowel disease. Gastroenterology. 1989 Mar;96(3):804–810. [PubMed]
  • Guyatt GH, Nogradi S, Halcrow S, Singer J, Sullivan MJ, Fallen EL. Development and testing of a new measure of health status for clinical trials in heart failure. J Gen Intern Med. 1989 Mar-Apr;4(2):101–107. [PubMed]

Articles from Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health are provided here courtesy of BMJ Publishing Group